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Map of Barnes Hill valve replacement works

Barnes Hill valve replacement

Seqwater will be replacing four valves at Barnes Hill, Mt Crosby over the coming months to maintain the reliability of important water supply pipelines within the SEQ Water Grid.

Did you know?

Barnes Hill is also known locally as the Camel Humps and is named after John Barnes. Mr Barnes owned the hills and river frontage in the area in the late 19th century.

Pipes have been laid in this area for a long time, starting with a 24 inch (300 mm) cast-iron main laid to connect the Mount Crosby pump station to Brisbane in 1890.

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Home What We're Doing Barnes Hill valve replacement

Seqwater will be replacing four valves at Barnes Hill, Mt Crosby over the coming months to maintain the reliability of important water supply pipelines within the SEQ Water Grid.

These valves are essential to water supply and as they are more than 50 years old, their performance is declining, and they need to be replaced.

The pipelines, which connect the Mt Crosby Water Treatment Plants to the SEQ Water Grid, are a critical part of the SEQ Water Grid and supply more than 50% of South East Queensland’s drinking water.

During the work, some residents may notice a reduction in water pressure or a change in taste, colour or odour of water. There is no anticipated loss of water supply. If you would like any more information about your water supply, please visit our water service provider Urban Utilities website.

To complete the valve replacements, parts of the pipelines will be shutdown and water drained from them in order to complete the valve replacement. Water will be released from the pipelines into surrounding water courses. 

 

Watch this video to learn more about why and how we release water from our pipelines to complete maintenance projects.

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  • Frequently asked questions
  • Seqwater bulk water pipes at Anstead

    Water supply to Brisbane and Ipswich safeguarded during trial pipeline upgrades

    A $1.5 million upgrade on two important water pipes which supply water from Mount Crosby Treatment Plant to Brisbane and Ipswich will begin this weekend.

    Minister for Water, Glenn Butcher said these pipes are some of the hardest working in the network, carrying millions of litres of water to residents and businesses across South East Queensland.


    “The work will involve taking a 4km section of the pipes at Barnes Hill offline temporarily to replace four valves which are reaching the end of their service life,” Mr Butcher said.

    “Up to 60 per cent of the water supply for Brisbane and Ipswich passes through these valves every day, so this work is critical to the ongoing supply of safe drinking water for the region.

    “This work demonstrates our focus on investing in water infrastructure and the longevity of the SEQ Water Grid.”

    Minister Butcher said Seqwater will carry out the first stage of the work this weekend, where a trial will be carried out which will involve temporarily isolating the pipes to carry out network checks to help plan the works.

    Seqwater Chief Executive Officer, Neil Brennan, said Seqwater and Urban Utilities were working together to ensure water supply was maintained during the trial and valve replacement works.

    “On average, around 400 million litres of water flows through the pipes at Barnes Hill every day,” Mr Brennan said.

    “We’ll be working with Urban Utilities to supply water from other parts of the network to minimise impacts for residents and businesses.”

    Urban Utilities spokesperson, Michelle Cull, said some properties in Brisbane and Ipswich may experience reduced or low water pressure during the trial and valve replacement works.

    “It is also possible customers in some suburbs may notice their water has a different taste or smell as they will receive water from supply locations they don’t typically get water from during the trial and valve replacement works,” Ms Cull said.

    “These changes will be temporary, and the water remains safe to drink.”

    No homes or businesses should experience a loss of water during the trial or the valve replacement works.

    Following the trial, a date will be set for the valve replacement project in July.

    For more information and the list of suburbs that may see potential impacts visit www.seqwater.com.au/project/barnes-hill or www.urbanutilities.com.au/BarnesHill

    If residents or businesses experience any issues with their water supply, they can contact Urban Utilities Faults and Emergencies on 13 23 64.

    Sections of the bulk water supply pipeline that runs between Mount Crosby water treatment plants and Green Hill Reservoir

    Night work and release of water 5-6 June 2021

    Work to replace four valves at Barnes Hill in Mount Crosby will be conducted in two stages. 

    In the first stage, a trial isolation will be conducted on the pipeline that runs through Barnes Hill, Mount Crosby over the weekend commencing 5 June 2021. This work will take two days to complete, and will not cause any loss to water supply.

    This work is being undertaken to prepare for the replacement of the valves at a later date - further notification will be issued when a date for this work is set.

    To prepare for the trial pipeline isolation, temporary scaffolding and lighting will be set up close to the pipeline, within the easement, on or near your property. This work will commence from the week starting Monday 31 May 2021.

    On the afternoon and night of Saturday 5 June water will be released from valves along the pipeline. Valves, known as scour valves, are located at low points in the pipelines and often flow onto the land into natural gullies, waterways, or drains. Environmental controls are in place to minimise impacts to the local environment, plants and animals.

    This work is scheduled to take place during the night, when water usage is at its lowest levels. There are no anticipated water supply disruptions.

    Once the release of water from the pipeline commences, water will be directed into the existing water course near your property.

    What to expect:

    • Seqwater employees and contractors will be in the area and if applicable, working and accessing the easement on your property.
    • Temporary lighting and scaffolding in the easement to ensure safety for work crews.
    • Preparation work hours will be between 7am and 5pm, Monday to Friday.
    • For the isolation, work crews will be onsite from 2pm Saturday 5 June until midday Sunday 6 June, working through the night.
    • Background noise and lights from machinery.
    • Water draining across nearby land into the existing draining system.
    • This work will not disrupt your water supply.

    If you have any concerns about this work, please contact the project manager during business hours on 07 3437 4107 or email [email protected].

  • Water supply updates

    Seqwater and Urban Utilities are working together to maintain water supply during the project. No loss of water should occur but some customers in parts of Ipswich and Brisbane may experience temporary impacts to their water such as a change in colour, taste and odour, and reduced pressure. Your water remains safe to drink.

    If you do experience a complete loss of water, please report this to Urban Utilities Faults and Emergencies on 13 23 64. 

    Building Managers: we recommend contacting the relevant fire and equipment service provider for advice about preparing your building systems before the potential pressure reduction.

    For the latest water supply notices, visit www.urbanutilities.com.au/BarnesHill.

  • What does the project involve?

    The project involves the replacement of four valves along the two main water supply pipelines which go between Mount Crosby water treatment plants and Green Hill Reservoir. These pipelines supply more than 50% of Brisbane’s water. In order to replace the valves, a 4km section of the pipelines will need to be taken offline for a short period of time, to allow for a safe and dry work site for the replacement work.

    Water supply to customers will not be disrupted. Seqwater and Urban Utilities are working together to maintain water supply, however some properties in Brisbane and Ipswich will experience temporary changes to their water.

    Why is the project required?

    This essential maintenance work is required to improve the reliability of the bulk water supply network. The project involves replacing four valves which are over 50 years old and have reached the end of their service life.

    How much will the project cost?

    The project budget is estimated to be $1.5 million.

    How long will the project take?

    The project will be carried out in two stages.

    Prior to the project, a trial will be carried out to take the pipelines offline. This will start from 2pm on Saturday 5 June, although some impacts may be noticed by customers from 6am on Thursday 3 June. The trial will involve taking the two pipes offline temporarily to carry out network checks to help plan the works.

    The date for the valve replacement works will be confirmed once the trial has been completed. The valve replacement work is scheduled to be carried out on a weekend in early to mid-July and is expected to take around 36 hours to complete, weather and site conditions permitting.

    What are the likely impacts of this project on the Brisbane community?

    Seqwater and Urban Utilities are working together to maintain water supply during the project. Customers in some parts of Ipswich and Brisbane may experience temporary impacts to their water such as a change in colour, taste and odour, and reduced pressure. No loss of water should occur. If you do experience a complete loss of water, please report this to Urban Utilities Faults and Emergencies on 13 23 64.

    Why do you need to take the pipes offline?

    In order to complete the valve replacement safely, a 4km section of pipeline will need to be temporarily taken offline to ensure a dry work environment.

    Water supply to customers will not be disrupted. Seqwater and Urban Utilities are working together to maintain water supply, however some properties in Brisbane and Ipswich will experience temporary changes to their water.

    Water will be redirected from other reservoirs to ensure all customers continue to have water supply. There may be some low water pressure in some suburbs as well as minor changes to taste, colour and odour. The water remains safe to drink.

     

    Why do the valves need replacing?

    The valves at Barnes Hill are more than 50 years old and have reached the end of their service life. These essential works will improve the reliability of Seqwater’s bulk water supply network.

    Why does my water smell or taste different? Is it safe to drink?

    Your water will remain safe to drink but it may taste or smell different. This is due to the water coming from an alternate location to your regular water supply. It’s common for water from different sources to have differences in taste and odour however all tap water meets the stringent Australian Drinking Water Guidelines.

    If you have any concerns about your water supply, contact your Water Service Provider.

    When will my water go back to normal? Will there be any lasting changes to my service/supply?

    Following the replacement of the valves and the water pipelines being brought back online, the water direction and source will return to regular operation. This will mean the water will return to usual.

    Why do you need to release so much water?

    At times, Seqwater must empty sections of pipeline to allow for routine maintenance, repairs and upgrades. For this project, we need to empty a 4km section of two pipelines which connects Camerons Hill Reservoir with Brisbane and Ipswich.

    The large amount of water is due to the size and amount of water that is required to travel through these pipelines in order to supply such a large amount of people.

    How does Seqwater manage environmental impacts of releasing water?

    Seqwater’s Environment and Cultural Heritage team assesses water releases and provides advice on the actions required to reduce any impacts for nearby plants and animals and comply with relevant legislation. Some of these actions include monitoring releases, dechlorinating the water, and installing erosion and sediment controls. Releasing water from pipelines is a common activity for many water authorities around Australia. We recognize water is a precious resource and we only release what we need to.

    How can residents best prepare for the valve replacement works?

    Residents can assist during this time by reducing their water use through the weekend-long pipeline isolation and valve replacement project.

    Preparation can include:

    • filling suitable containers with drinking water and storing them in the fridge
    • plan to shower or bath early Saturday 5 June or later tomorrow Sunday 6 June morning. Keep showers as short as possible.
    • If filling the pool or watering the garden is required, please do so before the weekend.

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