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East Bank Flood Resilience Program

Operated by Seqwater, the Mount Crosby Water Treatment Plants (East Bank and West Bank) are a critical part of the SEQ Water Grid, supplying about 50 per cent of South East Queensland’s drinking water.  Seqwater has developed a Master Plan for the East Bank Pump Station site, as part of the East Bank Flood Resilience Program.

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The Brisbane River Flood Study completed in 2017, highlighted that a number of buildings within the Mt Crosby precinct needed to be upgraded or relocated to increase the flood resilience of these assets. The East Bank Flood Resilience program focuses on mitigating the flooding risk to this essential infrastructure and renewing vital assets, while paying tribute to the rich cultural heritage of the site.

The development application for the Master Plan was submitted to Brisbane City Council in 2018 and granted approval to proceed. The development application approval of the Masterplan includes the re-development of the East Bank Pump Station site, construction of a new electrical substation, improvements to the local community hall, and a new community park.

The construction of a new bridge across the Brisbane River is underway and expected to be opened to all vehicles in Q1 2024. The existing weir bridge will be repurposed as a pedestrian walkway and cycle path.

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  • Aerial view of the Mount Crosby New Vehicle Bridge

    Mount Crosby Weir Bridge closes ahead of new vehicle bridge opening

    The Mount Crosby Weir Bridge will close to traffic from Friday, 16 February as final construction works take place in preparation to open the new Mount Crosby Vehicle Bridge.

    The new Mount Crosby Vehicle Bridge project is part of Seqwater’s East Bank Flood Resilience Program delivering increased flood resilience of vital assets at Mount Crosby. 

    Located 15 metres downstream of the weir bridge, the new bridge is approximately three metres higher than the existing bridge to better withstand flooding and will have dual lanes to improve traffic flow and ensure larger vehicles can cross safely.

    The existing weir bridge will close as work occurs to lay the new bridge’s road surface and connect it to Allawah Road West and East, as well as local infrastructure and services – before opening to traffic soon.

    With works set to take approximately six weeks (subject to weather and construction conditions), the alternate route is across the Brisbane River via Colleges Crossing on Mount Crosby Road.

    In the event of wet weather or an emergency where Colleges Crossing becomes unavailable during the closure period, Seqwater has developed a procedure that will allow the weir bridge to reopen to traffic on short notice.

    Seqwater is committed to minimising impacts throughout the works, including noise and traffic, and thanks the community for their understanding.

    After the new vehicle bridge is complete, the weir bridge will be repurposed and open to pedestrians and cyclists at a later date.

    Quotes attributable to Seqwater CEO, Neil Brennan:  

    “Closing the Mount Crosby Weir Bridge marks the final construction phase ahead of the new vehicle bridge opening soon.

    “Seqwater has worked hard to minimise impacts, including devising a plan to reopen the bridge on short notice in the event of an emergency or severe weather.

    “The East Bank Flood Resilience Program is designed to improve flood resilience and connectivity in Mount Crosby, and we are pleased to see this critical project nearing completion.”

    Further Information: 

    Seqwater’s East Bank Flood Resilience Program (EBFRP) involves a number of projects to reduce flood risks to critical bulk water infrastructure along the Brisbane River in Mount Crosby. For more information visit the Seqwater website.

    Aerial view of the Mount Crosby New Vehicle Bridge

    Mount Crosby Weir Bridge closure

    The Mount Crosby Weir Bridge will be closed to all traffic from 16 February 2024 , as final works commence to connect the Mount Crosby New Vehicle Bridge to Allawah Road West and East.

    This closure marks the start of the final phase of the new vehicle bridge construction and  includes earthworks and asphalting the new bridge tie-ins with Allawah Road East and West, line marking, replacing curb and channelling, and installing new streetlights and signage.

    The works are expected to take around six weeks and, once complete, the new two-lane vehicle bridge will open to traffic. The weir bridge will remain closed for repair and maintenance works, and open to pedestrians and bike riders at a later date.

    The alternate route during this closure is via Colleges Crossing on Mount Crosby Road. The project team is aware that during low-level flooding at Colleges Crossing, the Mount Crosby Weir Bridge becomes an access point for the community. If there is a wet weather event or an emergency during the closure period and Colleges Crossing becomes unavailable, the weir bridge can reopen to traffic at short notice. 

    Expected traffic impacts

    • Mount Crosby Weir Bridge closure to all traffic from 16 February 2024 (subject to weather). The alternate route for approximately six weeks is via Colleges Crossing on Mount Crosby Road.
    • Heavy vehicles will access the Mount Crosby new vehicle bridge worksite from Mount Crosby Road and Allawah Road East between 6:30am to 6:30pm Monday to Friday, and 6:30am to 4:30pm Saturday. 

    Expected construction impacts

    • Construction activity associated with road surfacing and services connection including steel works, sawing, and heavy vehicle movements between 6:30am to 6:30pm Monday to Friday, and 6:30am to 4:30pm Saturday.  
    • Nearby residents and businesses may experience temporary noise impacts as well as low levels of vibration and dust.
    • Reversing beepers and flashing lights on construction vehicles will be used as this is a safety requirement.

    This work may need to be paused and/or rescheduled in the event of bad weather. Every effort will be made to minimise impacts on the local community and environment while this work is undertaken. Seqwater and BMD Constructions thank the community in advance for your patience and understanding while these works are carried out.  

    An aerial photo of construction at the new Mt Crosby bridge

    EBFRP Bulletin Update - December 2023

    Project construction reached several major milestones recently. Installation of the bridge deck units was completed, and we commenced removal of the in-river worksite and earthworks for the local road connections.  To read the full bulletin, click here.

    Mt Crosby East Bank Pump Station

    EBFRP Bulletin Update - August 2023

    This Bulletin provides the latest information and project updates for the months of April – July 2023. To read the full bulletin, click here.

    Foundation work has begun on the new Mount Crosby Vehicle Bridge

    EBFRP bulletin update - March 2023

    The Mount Crosby Weir Bridge has reopened to vehicles following extensive repairs while construction has started on a new, higher, dual-lane bridge that will provide greater flood resilience and capacity to meet the needs of the growing community.

    The team began works in preparation for the foundations of the new Vehicle Bridge in January 2023 before placing the bridge decks begins later this year. The new bridge’s foundations will be 18 metres deep with the bridge’s piers rising 12 metres above the riverbed. This increases the bridge’s height by almost 3 metres above the existing Weir Bridge and will provide extra support during flooding events.

    About the works

    • Construction of a temporary worksite in the riverbed has now been established, requiring a small section of the river below the Mount Crosby Weir to be dewatered. Aquatic species within this area are being safely relocated and a temporary channel will soon be installed to facilitate water flow from upstream to downstream, while the worksite is active.
    • Temporary water barriers have been installed on the Mount Crosby Weir Bridge to divert water flow away from the work site.
    • A temporary levee bank has been constructed on the Brisbane River downstream of the worksite to minimise water ingress within the area.
    • The team have commenced constructing an access ramp on the east bank down into the worksite.
    • Construction of seven bridge foundations and piers across the Brisbane River will begin soon, requiring riverbed pile drilling, steel works and concrete pouring.
    • Neighbours to the worksite may experience low levels of vibration, noise and dust associated with this work and observe regular truck movements to and from site, concrete trucks, drill rigs, welding, and cranes.

    To read the full bulletin click here.

    Mt Crosby Weir Bridge reopens

    Mount Crosby Weir Bridge reopens

    The Mount Crosby Weir Bridge has reopened to vehicles following extensive repairs, after the low-level crossing was damaged during the extreme flood event in February and March 2022.

    Seqwater Chief Executive Officer, Neil Brennan said the re-opening of the 95-year-old, single-lane weir bridge, which crosses the Brisbane River between Kholo and Mount Crosby, reinstates an important route for locals and coincides with construction starting on a new, higher, dual-lane bridge that will provide greater flood resilience and capacity to meet the needs of the growing community.

    “I’m pleased to announce the Mount Crosby Weir Bridge has re-opened to traffic as we see the adjacent new bridge reach a significant construction milestone,” Mr Brennan said.

    “Once complete, the new dual-lane bridge will be able to accommodate more vehicles, two-way traffic, and will be almost three metres higher than the existing weir bridge, providing greater flood resilience and connectivity within the local area.”

    Mr Brennan thanked the community for their patience while repairs to the Weir Bridge were underway. 

    “Seqwater worked alongside our project partners BMD Constructions to replace more than 265 metres of damaged guard rail, make more than 110 individual concrete repairs along the weir bridge surface, and reconstruct the bridge approaches to make the crossing safe for traffic once again,” Mr Brennan said.

    “We know this bridge makes a real difference to travel times, so we thank the local community for their patience and understanding while these vital repairs were made.

    “The weir bridge will remain open to traffic as the new bridge is built and will then be converted into a pedestrian and cycle pathway, to continue providing an important community link for many years to come.”

    The reopening of the Mount Crosby Weir Bridge and construction of the new vehicle bridge is part of Seqwater’s East Bank Flood Resilience Program, to improve the area’s flood resilience and connectivity.

    The new bridge will be located approximately 15 metres downstream from the existing Mount Crosby Weir Bridge. Installation of the foundations has commenced, which will be followed by the placement of the bridge decks later this year.

    The new Mount Crosby Vehicle Bridge is expected to be completed by the end of 2023.

    For more information on the East Bank Flood Resilience Program, visit: www.seqwater.com.au/project/east-bank-flood-resilience-program

    Repairs underway on Mount Crosby Weir Bridge

    EBFRP bulletin update - Dec 2022

    Our team is working to reopen the Mount Crosby Weir Bridge as soon as possible. The overhanging damaged guardrails have been removed and a temporary guardrail has been installed. A mobile scaffold for bridge repairs has also been erected and bridge deck and approach repairs are underway. A new guardrail will also be installed in mid-January 2023 prior to the bridge reopening.

    Early works are also continuing on the new Vehicle Bridge, despite continued high rain and river levels. Ongoing extensive planning includes minimising construction impacts to heritage elements and the river,  as well as flora and fauna within the project site. The new Vehicle Bridge will be dual lane and built almost three metres higher than the existing Weir Bridge and designed to withstand flooding and recover from inundation. It will improve traffic flow for the growing community and ensure large vehicles such as trucks and buses can safely cross. Following completion, the bridge ownership will transfer to Brisbane City Council. 

    To read the full bulletin click here.

     

     

    Compound Location - West Bank

    Bridge works underway

    BMD Constructions have now mobilised to the site of the new vehicle bridge and have commenced early works. Over the coming weeks, as BMD undertake site preparations, there will be an increase in activity, vehicles and deliveries to the East and West bank sites.

    What to expect:

    • You may notice an increase in traffic on both Stumers and Allawah Road, including large vehicles carrying materials for the construction works. A traffic management plan has been established for the project in consultation with local council.
    • Standard working hours are Monday to Friday between 6:30am and 6.30pm and Saturdays from 6:30am and 4:30pm.
    • There may be an increase in noise and dust associated with this work and we will work to reduce these impacts where possible.
    • Vegetation will be removed in accordance with relevant approvals and will be kept to a minimum. Vegetation works will be supervised by an arborist and a fauna spotter-catcher.
    • The work areas will be fenced off during the construction period for your safety, so please follow the instructions of our staff and signage.
    • We do not expect disruptions to water supply or other utilities as a result of this work.

    For more information about the New Vehicle Bridge Project, click here to read the fact sheet.

    Vehicle access to the Mount Crosby Weir Bridge (Green) will be from both the East (Stumers Road) and the West (Allawah Road).
    Image: Vehicle access to the Mount Crosby Weir Bridge (Green) will be from both the East (Stumers Road) and the West (Allawah Road).

     

    Kindergarten - Mount Crosby

    EBFRP bulletin update

    Seqwater is currently undertaking a program of work to reduce asset and flood risks to essential bulk water infrastructure within the historical Mount Crosby East Bank Precinct. This includes upgrades to infrastructure, construction of a new electrical substation, improvements to the local community hall, a shared user pathway, dedication of a new park, construction of a new weir bridge and a new, purpose-built kindergarten. Click here to read a bulletin with the latest update.
     

    Planned-Works---EBFRP

    Easement access and night works at 6pm Tuesday 19 April 2022

    Seqwater will undertaking night works at 6pm on Tuesday 19 April 2022 as part of the East Bank Flood Resilience Program.

    The Mount Crosby Water Treatment Plants are a critical part of the SEQ Water Grid, and they supply about 50 per cent of South East Queensland's drinking water, including Brisbane, Ipswich and Logan.  Seqwater is currently undertaking a program of work to reduce asset and flood risks to essential bulk water infrastructure at the historical Mount Crosby East Bank Precinct.

    As part of the Program, Seqwater will need to undertake engineering investigations of services in the area, including the watermain near to your property. The work will involve accessing a valve pit and replacing an air valve.

    What to expect:

    • Work is to occur on the evening of Tuesday 19 April 2022 subject to weather conditions and other unexpected delays.
    • Working hours are between 6.00pm and 6.00am.
    • Equipment will include the use of light vehicles and hand tools. You may notice workers in the area with headlamps.
    • There may be an increase in noise and traffic - we will minimise disruptions.
    • We don’t expect the proposed works to impact your water supply, or other utilities.
    • The contractors will adhere to COVID – 19 work safety practices.

    For more information, please email [email protected] or call 1300 SEQWATER (1300 737 928) during business hours.

    A new vehicle bridge at Mt Crosby will be constructed to provide safe access over the Brisbane River. The new bridge will be more flood resilient and designed to meet current safety and engineering design standards.

    Construction a step closer for new bridge at Mount Crosby

    Construction will soon be underway to build a vehicle bridge which will become the new crossing for traffic to replace the existing Mt Crosby Weir Bridge.

    The existing single-lane weir bridge, which crosses the Brisbane River to connect Kholo and Mt Crosby, has been earmarked to be converted into a pedestrian pathway, with the new dual-lane bridge built alongside it for vehicle traffic.

    The multi-million-dollar project is embedded within the East Bank Flood Resilience Program– a program of work to improve flood resilience and connectivity within the growing area.

    Minister for Water Glenn Butcher said the new bridge would not only improve traffic flow but also provide greater flood resilience.

    “The new bridge will be built almost three-metres higher than the existing bridge and is designed to better withstand flooding and recover from being inundated, should the unlikely event occur,” Mr Butcher said.

    “The dual lane will also improve the flow of traffic for the growing community and ensure that large vehicles such as truck and buses can cross safely.”   

    The construction contract for the new bridge was recently awarded to BMD Constructions, with construction expected to begin in the coming months and completed before the end of 2023.

    Seqwater Chief Executive Officer Neil Brennan said while the work moved ahead on building the new bridge, work was also progressing to repair and reopen the existing Mt Crosby Weir Bridge, which was significantly damaged during the extreme weather event in late-February this year. 

    “Engineering assessments have been completed to assess the damage and we are now working to repair and reopen the bridge to traffic,” Mr Brennan said.

    “We realise this is an inconvenience for motorists who use the bridge regularly and appreciate their patience while we work to make the bridge safe for travel once again.”

    Mr Brennan said once the new bridge is built, the 96-year-old Mount Crosby Weir Bridge will be repurposed as a cycle and walkway to improve the local amenity and retain its historical significance. 

    “The East Bank Flood Resilience Program will help to safeguard important assets including the Mt Crosby East Bank Water Treatment Plant. The East Bank and West Bank plants supply about 50 per cent of South East Queensland’s drinking water,” Mr Brennan said.

    In addition to the bridge other projects in the East Bank Flood Resilience Program include civil and enabling works for a new Energex substation, renovations to the historical Works Hill Residential Precinct and the construction of a new kindergarten.

    For more information on the East Bank Flood Resilience Program visit  https://www.seqwater.com.au/project/east-bank-flood-resilience-program

    The Mt Crosby Weir Bridge has been closed after it was damaged by floodwaters

    Weir bridge remains closed as Seqwater investigates damage

    The Mount Crosby Weir Bridge is temporarily closed as a result of the recent weather event.

    Seqwater Chief Operating Officer Stuart Cassie said the bridge was inundated by water during the event and visual inspections had identified significant damage to the deck surface and guardrails.

    “Safety is our top priority and we have closed the bridge whilst engineering assessments are undertaken,” Mr Cassie said.

    “We are arranging for a qualified third-party engineer to attend site and assess the damage and once this is completed, we will update the community.

    “We acknowledge the closure will inconvenience local residents and we thank them for their understanding whilst we undertake assessments and ensure their safety.”  

    Mr Cassie said Seqwater would provide a further update once the assessments on the bridge were completed.

    Photo of excavation works at a site

    Civil and Enabling Works to commence from March

    Seqwater has awarded the construction contract for the East Bank Flood Resilience Program (EBFRP) Civil and Enabling works to McIlwain Civil Engineering Pty Ltd.  https://mcilwain.com/

    The Civil and Enabling works project involves earthworks, construction of a mass block retaining walls, new substation pad, provision of a new sealed access road to the new substation pad, upgrading the Eastern Access Road including conduit installation and reconfiguration of the six-way intersection.  Work for this component of the EBFRP is scheduled to commence work from March 2022. Read more about the construction phase here

    The completion of this EBFRP Civil and Enabling Project will allow Energex to commence the construction of the new Substation.

     

    For more information regarding this work or other aspects of the EBFRP please contact [email protected]

    East Bank Flood Resilience Program - Mt Crosby Weir bridge.jpg

    Bridge investigation work

    Seqwater is planning the construction of a new two-lane bridge adjacent to the existing Mt Crosby Weir Bridge as part of the East Bank Flood Resilience Program. In planning for the new bridge Seqwater will need to undertake engineering assessments including vacuum excavation and pot holing near to the existing weir bridge. This work will commence on Wednesday (08/09) and Thursday (09/09) between 7am – 4pm and is not expected to impede traffic flow.

    Works Hill Cottage 1

    Works Hill Cottages

    Seqwater is undertaking general building works on the Works Hill Residential Precinct to improve the liveability of the cottages and connect them to modern services. For more information, please refer to the factsheet here.

    East Bank Flood Resilience Program - Mt Crosby Weir bridge.jpg

    Temporary road closure and night works

    Seqwater is planning the construction of a new two-lane bridge adjacent to the existing Mt Crosby Weir Bridge as part of the East Bank Flood Resilience Program.  In planning for the new bridge Seqwater will need to undertake engineering assessments of the existing weir bridge. The engineering assessments will require the temporary closure of the bridge for two nights.

    Work will take place at night to minimise traffic impacts.

     What to expect:

    • Work is to occur from Monday 7 June 2021 and Tuesday 8 June 2021 subject to weather conditions and other unexpected delays.
    • Working hours are between 6.00pm and 6.00am. 
    • Temporary bridge closure with traffic controllers diverting vehicles to Colleges Crossing.
    • Equipment will include, but is not limited to, a truck mounted under-bridge inspection unit, and utility vehicles. 
    • Concrete drilling may be required, this work will be conducted early in the evening. 
    • There may be an increase in noise and traffic - we will minimise disruptions where possible. 
    • We don’t expect the proposed works to impact your water supply, or other utilities. 
    • The contractors will adhere to COVID – 19 work safety practices. 

    For more information, please email [email protected] or call 1300 SEQWATER (1300 737 928) during business hours.

    Mt Crosby East Bank Pump Station

    Progress update - March 2021

    Operated by Seqwater, the Mount Crosby Water Treatment Plants (East Bank and West Bank) are a critical part of the SEQ Water Grid, supplying about 50 per cent of South East Queensland’s drinking water.  Seqwater has developed a Master Plan for the East Bank Pump Station site, as part of the East Bank Flood Resilience Program. 

    The Brisbane River Flood Study completed in 2017, highlighted that a number of buildings within the Mt Crosby precinct needed to be upgraded or relocated to increase the flood resilience of these assets. The East Bank Flood Resilience program focuses on mitigating the flooding risk to this essential infrastructure and renewing vital assets, while paying tribute to the rich cultural heritage of the site.

    The development application for the Master Plan was submitted to Brisbane City Council in 2018 and Seqwater has been granted approval to proceed. The development application approval of the Masterplan includes the re-development of the East Bank Pump Station site, construction of a new electrical substation, improvements to the local community hall, and a new community park.

    The construction of a new bridge across the Brisbane River and a new, purpose – built kindergarten are also being considered and are subject to further planning and approvals. Construction work is expected to commence on the electrical substation pad site in late - 2021. 

    For further information telephone 1300 SEQWATER (1300 737 928) or email [email protected]

  • What is the East Bank Flood Resilience Program?

    The Mount Crosby Water Treatment Plants are a critical part of the SEQ Water Grid and supply about 50 per cent of South East Queensland’s drinking water supply including the cities of Brisbane, Ipswich and Logan. Following the severe flood events in 2011 and 2013, Seqwater identified improvements across the SEQ Water Grid to improve resilience during all weather. In 2016, Seqwater began a detailed assessment of the East Bank Pump Station site and its ability to cope and recover during a flood. The Brisbane River Catchment Flood Study showed the probability of floodwater inundating the East Bank Pump Station site was greater than previously thought, which is why Seqwater is focused on mitigating the flooding risk to this essential infrastructure. Seqwater’s East Bank Flood Resilience Program (EBFRP) involves a number of improvements, to reduce flood risks to critical bulk water infrastructure along the Brisbane River in Mount Crosby. The Master Plan also aims to celebrate the area’s rich cultural heritage. Seqwater recognises the historical significance of the East Bank Pump Station and surrounding precinct and is committed to working with key stakeholders and the local community to revitalise the area as part of the EBFRP.

    What is the EBFRP Master Plan?

    Seqwater has finalised a Master Plan for the East Bank Pump Station site and surrounding area, as part of the East Bank Flood Resilience Program (EBFRP). The Master Plan aims to reduce flood risks, while also celebrating the area’s rich cultural heritage and improving connectivity for the local community. 

    Seqwater worked with key stakeholders and local residents to develop a Master Plan that protects our vital water infrastructure and also benefits the community.

    How has the local community been involved?

    In early 2018, Seqwater developed a draft Master Plan for the East Bank Pump Station site, aimed at reducing flood risks, while also celebrating the area’s rich cultural heritage and increasing connectivity. The draft Master Plan was released for consultation in August 2018, and the community was invited to attend an open day at the East Bank Pump Station.

    Feedback included an interest in increasing connectivity throughout the area, better access to community facilities, and maintaining the site’s rich cultural heritage.

    Following community consultation there were some changes to the Master Plan. Seqwater presented the updated Master Plan to the community at a community session on Thursday 18 October 2018 at Mount Crosby Bowls Club.

     

    Why is the Mount Crosby East Bank Pump Station important?

    The East Bank Pump Station pumps up to 500 million litres (ML) of water a day to the East Bank Water Treatment Plant, which is a critical part of the SEQ Water Grid.

    The historical Mount Crosby East Bank Pump Station is located near the Mount Crosby Weir Bridge along the Brisbane River. The pumping station was completed in 1893. Originally steam-powered, coal was transported via a tramway to fire the boilers, creating the steam that drove the pumping engines. This was the practice until steaming ceased in 1948.

    Inside the station are eight wells and 16 high voltage pumps. River water is drawn from the weir pool through two intake towers and into the East Bank Pump Station. The pumps then move water to the treatment plant to be turned into safe drinking water. 

    What has Seqwater done about the flood risks since 2011?

    Following the severe flood events in 2011 and 2013, Seqwater identified improvements across the SEQ Water Grid to improve resilience during all weather. Since then, Seqwater has increased its chemical storage capacity at the plants so we can continue to treat water during severe weather, invested in improving catchment health, and enhanced our emergency response plans. Capital projects at the Mt Crosby Water Treatment Plants include:

    ·  water proofing the wells inside the East Bank Pump Station

    ·  repairing the river embankment near the East Bank Pump Station

    ·  an alum upgrade to improve treatment processes at East Bank

    ·  centrifuge upgrades to improve sludge handling at both East Bank and West Bank

    ·  upgrading the onsite chemical storage capacity at the East Bank Water Treatment Plant.

    In 2016, Seqwater also began a detailed assessment of the East Bank Pump Station site and its ability to cope and recover during a flood.

    The Brisbane River Catchment Flood Study showed the probability of floodwater inundating the East Bank Pump Station site was greater than previously thought, which is why Seqwater is focused on mitigating the flooding risk to this essential infrastructure.

    As a result, Seqwater has been working closely with Energex to increase the flood immunity of the existing critical electrical infrastructure that provides power to the East Bank Pump Station. Seqwater worked closely with Brisbane City Council to develop the East Bank Flood Resilience Program and Master Plan to reduce flood risks to critical bulk water infrastructure along the Brisbane River, including the East Bank Pump Station.

    Why is the substation being relocated to higher ground?

    The East Bank Pump Station pumps up to 500 million litres (ML) of water a day to the East Bank Water Treatment Plant, supplying drinking water to 1.6 million South East Queenslanders.

    Following the severe flood events in 2011 and 2013, Seqwater identified improvements across the SEQ Water Grid to improve resilience during all weather. In 2016, Seqwater began a detailed assessment of the East Bank Pump Station site and its ability to cope and recover during a flood. The Brisbane River Catchment Flood Study showed the probability of floodwater inundating the East Bank Pump Station site was greater than previously thought, which is why Seqwater is focused on mitigating the flooding risk to this essential infrastructure.

    After a flood, we need to get the Mount Crosby Water Treatment Plants operating as quickly as possible, because water is critical for human health and large volumes of water are needed for a flood clean up.

    To improve flood resilience, Seqwater will construct a new substation on higher ground and decommission the old substation.

    Relocating the substation will ensure the pump station can be back up and running as quickly as possible after a major flood. The existing substation, located near the historic pump station building, is nearing end-of-life and will soon require replacement. Given the critical role of this infrastructure and flood risk associated with the current location, constructing a new substation on higher ground will help secure South East Queensland’s water supply during all weather.

    What work has been done to prepare for the new substation?

    Works included sealing sections of Stumers Road, the installation of electrical conduits to upgrade power supply to the East Bank Raw Water Pump Station at the river and the construction of the substation slab.

    The new substation will be located on Seqwater-owned vacant land on the northern side of Stumers Road, Mount Crosby, beside the existing community hall. A number of potential locations were assessed as part of the Master Plan and the preferred site was chosen because of its proximity to existing water infrastructure and low flood risk. The site also has minimal impact on the area’s cultural heritage.

    The site has been handed over to Energex and it is anticipated work will start in 2023.

    Are you revegetating the site that was cleared for the new substation?

    Trees removed for the substation works will be offset via an extended rehabilitation program in the small valley below the substation site. The program will involve weed clearing and planting natives to achieve a natural regional ecosystem density. This has been conditioned in the Development Approval and will be overseen by Council and Seqwater.

    Work will take 4-5 years before going into a maintenance period of two years. A concentrated effort in weed control is required so native plants will not have to complete with introduced listed weed species. This will take 12-24 months before planting can begin.

    Planting will be undertaken by a rehab specialist and the establishment and growth of the native species will be carefully monitored. We anticipate that this rehabilitation zone will be restored to a natural bushland area and will assist in improving the amenity in this part of Stumers Road, with native food trees attracting more wildlife.

    What is happening to the Mount Crosby Weir bridge?

    The Mount Crosby Weir was constructed in 1927 to create a pumping pool for the water treatment plant and with a bridge crossing to provide access to coal for the nearby pump station. The Master Plan involves constructing a new vehicle bridge over the Brisbane River, and repurposing the existing heritage weir bridge for cyclists and pedestrians. Repurposing the existing bridge will allow access the Mount Crosby Sportsground on Allawah Road.

    The February 2022 flood event caused significant damage to the deck surface and guardrails and the Weir Bridge was closed for public safety. 

    The Weir Bridge reopened to traffic in early February 2023 following extensive repairs. Seqwater worked alongside our project partners BMD Constructions to replace more than 265 metres of damaged guard rail, make more than 110 individual concrete repairs along the weir bridge surface, and reconstruct the bridge approaches to make the crossing safe for traffic once again. We would like to thank the local community for their patience and understanding while these vital repairs were made. You can read more here. 

    Will the guardrails be able to be dropped during flooding?

    Yes, the temporary guardrails will be able to be dropped as they will be like-for-like rails. When the new Vehicle Bridge is completed, screens will be installed for the existing Weir Bridge which will become the pedestrian bridge (these screens can be removed if required).

    What is proposed for the new Vehicle Bridge?

    During low-level flooding at Colleges Crossing, the Mount Crosby Weir bridge becomes an access point for the community. The Weir Bridge is also critical to Seqwater operations and provides a link between the West Bank Water Treatment Plant (WTP) and East Bank WTP.

    The option of a new Vehicle Bridge provides greater flood resilience than the existing Weir Bridge. The new Vehicle Bridge will be constructed about 15 metres downstream of the existing Mount Crosby Weir Bridge on the Brisbane River. It will be made of steel-reinforced concrete and about three metres higher than the existing Weir Bridge, 187 metres long and nine metres wide including the barriers and shoulders. The new Vehicle Bridge will be able to better withstand flooding and will be dual lane to improve the flow of traffic and ensure large vehicles such as trucks and buses can cross safely.

    At the completion of the new Vehicle Bridge, the existing one lane Weir Bridge will be converted to a pedestrian pathway.

    When will the new Vehicle Bridge be completed?

    The new bridge is expected to be completed in Q1 2024. The ownership and management of the bridge will transfer to Brisbane City Council in 2025, after a one-year defects liability period at construction conclusion.

    Works are underway to install the bridge’s foundations and piers before placing the bridge decks. 

    Our team has undertaken extensive planning and assessments to deliver this engineering feat safely, efficiently, and with minimal impact to the surrounding environment, community and heritage elements. This has included securing the required permits and undertaking onsite trials of the planned works methodology.

    How are you protecting the aquatic life during the construction of the Vehicle Bridge?

    The project team has undertaken extensive planning and assessments to deliver this engineering feat safely and efficiently. As part of these works, and in accordance with the General Fisheries Permit issued by the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) for this project, a number of measures are in place to mitigate construction impacts on the surrounding environment, including:

    • Specialist aquatic ecologists onsite to ensure works are in-line with industry best practice.  
    • An Seqwater environmental representative is also onsite to ensure works are in-line with required works permits.
    • Daily water quality testing including dissolved oxygen and temperature tests within the water.
    • Instream sediment controls have been deployed. 
    • Water pumps installed promote water movement over and around the weir. This movement supports downstream aquatic environment.

    You can read more here.

    Are you landscaping the east and west bank approaches between the new Vehicle Bridge and existing Weir Bridge?

    The disturbed areas will be remediated to a similar condition as they are now. Seqwater has appointed a principal contractor to oversee the remediation of the approaches as part of the works.

    A new footpath will be constructed from the bridge through to Allawah Rd/Alan Donovan Lane intersection and to allow safe crossing. Kerb and channelling will be installed on the bridge approach from the intersection.

    How are you protecting the heritage elements of the Weir Bridge during construction of the new Vehicle Bridge?

    Seqwater is committed to protecting the heritage features of the Weir Bridge. Within the project site, four elements are listed on the Queensland Heritage Register including the Mt Crosby Weir Bridge, fish ladder, 1899 remnant bridge piers, and water intake tower.

    The new Vehicle Bridge has been carefully designed to largely avoid impacting heritage elements in the area. This includes building the new Vehicle Bridge downstream of the Weir Bridge and placing the new bridge’s piers in between the remnant 1899 bridge piers. In addition, the new Vehicle Bridge won’t impact the historic fish ladder on the downstream side of the weir.

    During construction of the new Vehicle Bridge, the following measures will be in place to mitigate construction impacts on some or all the heritage elements:

    • Installation of vibration monitors on the existing weir bridge, remnant bridge piers and fish ladder
    • Engaging an archaeologist to monitor works particularly when disturbing the ground during road approach remediation and piling
    • Installing exclusion zones around heritage elements, to avoid accidental damage by plant equipment or vehicles
    • Careful planning of all site works including boring, piling and equipment movement
    • Obtaining necessary approvals from Department of Environment and Science, the Department of Transport and Main Roads, the Queensland Heritage Council, Brisbane City Council, and Seqwater.

     

    What does the electrical infrastructure upgrade project involve?

    This project involves the upgrade of critical electrical infrastructure at the East Bank Pump Station, to ensure it continues to operate in peak condition.

    The project will upgrade the existing motors, invest in critical spares, improve the flood resilience of the heritage listed pump station building, and upgrade electrical infrastructure to connect to the new substation.

    Early designs for the critical electrical infrastructure are underway. The contract for this project is expected to be awarded in 2023.

    Why are there houses at the East Bank Pump Station site?

    The Mount Crosby Water Treatment Plant complex was built in the late 19th century to expand the reticulated water supply for Brisbane. Throughout the 1880s, Brisbane suffered from repeat shortages of potable water and a permanent water supply needed to be found.

    A group of cottages were built around the same time for the plant’s operators because of the relative isolation of Mount Crosby. A distinctive feature of the Works Hill site is the placement of the dwellings, which was designed to reflect the hierarchy of the occupants. The Works Hill Residential Precinct comprises two detached houses, four duplexes and one cottage, and is one of the few examples of this type of worker housing remaining in Queensland. The Works Hill Residential Precinct is located on Stumers Road, to the east of the East Bank Pump Station.

    The houses were designed by Brisbane-based (Scottish-born) Charles McLay, who built Customs House in Brisbane, and are listed on Brisbane City Council’s heritage register.

    What is happening to the dwellings?

    Renovations have been undertaken to maintain their heritage value, meet regulatory requirements and improve liveability. Seqwater own and maintain dwellings 105 – 112. Works have included the connection to water mains, waste-water treatment, improvements to electrical wiring and the installation of NBN connectivity.

    The renovations of dwellings 102 – 104 include the repair of floors and walls, new kitchen and bathroom cabinetry, new roofing and the opening of verandas and installation of balustrading reflecting the original design. These renovations are due for completion in August 2023.

    The dwellings will go on sale at the conclusion of the renovations. Only dwellings owned by Seqwater will go on sale, including 106, 107, 108 and 109 and 110.

    Will you be restoring the original cottage gardens?

    Some vegetation removal was required to comply with Brisbane City Council’s Bushfire Overlay Code, to reduce the risk of fire and to complete the remediation work.

    Gardens are planned along the retaining wall and between dwellings along the access road. The details of the garden are yet to be finalised, however hydro mulching (mixture of mulch, fertiliser and seed), geotextiles and turf will also be laid in areas where erosion may be an issue such as steeper areas.

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